POWERS OF A COLLECTOR

The official title for a collector is “District Collector.” He or she is the one who has granted authority to handle or collect taxes in a specific territory or district. He or she is the highest-ranking Indian Civil Administrative Officer in charge of managing a district’s administration and revenue collection. Additionally endowed with executive magisterial authority, the District Collector also holds the title of District Magistrate.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DISTRICT COLLECTOR AND DISTRICT MAGISTRATE:

WHO IS A DISTRICT COLLECTOR?

The District Collector is a district’s highest-ranking revenue officer. A district magistrate is an Indian Administrative Service (IAS) officer who oversees the general administration of a district in India. The term “district magistrate” is frequently abbreviated to “DM.”

WHO IS A DISTRICT MAGISTRATE?

An officer in charge of a district, India’s fundamental administrative division, is known as a district magistrate. In several Indian states, he or she is also referred to as the District Collector or the Deputy Commissioner. He or she is referred to as the DM or DC in everyday speech. There are over 741 districts in India.

THE EVOLUTION:

According to the current situation, a Collector’s duties include administering criminal justice for a specific District and collecting taxes as the District Collector.

It is now essential to re-examine and re-define the functions and responsibilities of the district administration in light of the introduction of Panchayat Raj Institutions and Municipal bodies by the 73rd and 74th constitutional amendments, respectively. Modern challenges demand modern answers, thus it’s critical to devolve new processes or ways of making decisions in order to combat administration. The provision of a distinctive administrative practice is similarly important, and the district needs to find someone who meets the qualifications for the District Collector position, which has been established over the course of two centuries.

HISTORY AND ROLE OF A DISTRICT COLLECTOR IN ADMINISTRATION OF A DISTRICT:

For the past 200 years, a District Collector has held one of the most significant positions in India’s administrative system. During the period before India became independent, when the agricultural industry played a significant role in the nation’s economy, a Collector was chosen to oversee the collection of land income. He or she had extensive administrative authority over criminal legislation throughout the Pre-Independence era as well. At that time, The Collector was seen as the primary guardian figure responsible for the welfare and advancement of the citizens living under his or her control. Every collector had access to a “region” within the boundaries of the British Empire. When it comes to India, the district has always been one of the most important administrative divisions in some capacity.

A person at the district level was given strong authority to handle a variety of problems and concerns that arose in that district by a number of enactments passed by the British Parliament, which was the first legislative body to ever rule and administer India. When a head of administration handles the administration and collection of revenues and other incomes, he or she is typically referred to or called the “Collector.” The same head is referred to or recognized as the District Magistrate while performing duties related to administering the criminal justice system, and the Deputy Commissioner when performing duties related to ordinary district administration together with auxiliary roles governing the rules of tenancy.

A district’s administration is headed by the District Collector, District Magistrate, or Deputy Commissioner, who is also in charge of the fundamental oversight and management of the Police. The District Collector is still regarded as an essential component of administration, even after 75 years of our country’s independence, the diversification of the Indian economy with increased specialization, the growth of industrialization, and other economic activity in the majority of the country, with the exception of the major cities. He or she is also recognized as a District’s top representative. He or she is seen as the person who may be contacted for solutions to issues relating to land disputes, the lack of essential commodities, the in-adequateness of any crisis relief, community disagreements, the welfare of the district, and many other issues.

POWERS AND FUNCTIONS OF A COLLECTOR:

The Chief Representative of a district, a Collector, has certain duties and authority. His or her activities can be divided into two categories: developmental and regulatory tasks.

REGULATORY FUNCTIONS:

  • Upkeep of the law and order. With the aid of the Deputy Superintendent of Police for that area, he or she oversees the maintenance of law and order in a certain district.
  • He or she is crucial in the assessment of a district’s lands for the purpose of collecting land income. Due to the fact that they possess the same powers as a first class magistrate, they also carry out magisterial duties.

DEVELOPMENTAL FUNCTIONS:

  • The Collector gives instructions and oversees the implementation of development plans.
  • By removing obstacles in their path, he or she makes sure that the plans are carried out properly and that the goals are met in the allotted time.
  • In addition, he or she ensures that there isn’t any corruption.

GENERIC FUNCTIONS INCLUDING REGULATORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL ASPECTS:

PUBLIC SECURITY, LAW AND ORDER AND PREVENTIVE ACTION

  • He or she makes preventive arrests in accordance with the Criminal Procedure Code and for reasons of national security in order to ensure the peace and tranquilly of the public.
  • He or she establishes curfews that limit citizens’ freedom of movement in order to suppress illegal gatherings or activities.

REVENUE FUNCTIONS:

  • The District Collector is in charge of all lands within a district and is primarily responsible for collecting taxes.
  • As the director of Revenue Administration, he or she is in charge of collecting taxes on land, government fees, reformation initiatives, maintaining land records, and gathering statistics on rural areas.
  • He or she has the authority to administer government estates, award rehabilitation grants, and compensate Zamindari Abolition victims.

DISTRICT PLANNING:

  • He or she is in charge of organizing the yearly and five-year district plans for a district’s welfare and development as the chairperson of the District Planning Council (DPC).
  • He or she serves as the head of the district bank’s coordination cell and monitors the development and execution of plans, policies, and initiatives. Additionally, he or she foresees expenses and allocates the appropriate sum of money for them.

DISASTER MANAGEMENT:

  • The Collector has a responsibility to control natural disasters like famines, floods, or epidemics and protect the afflicted citizens.
  • He or she is also the Chairman of the District Disaster Management Committee (DDMC), and as such, it is required of him or her to take preventative actions to lessen the effects of catastrophes.
  • He or she is permitted to offer free assistance to the district’s impacted residents.

DISTRICT CIVIL SUPPLIES:

  • He or she oversees the management of the Public Distribution System (PDS), which is run by fair pricing stores that sell goods and commodities like rice, wheat, sugar, kerosene, and other necessities. The government-issued Ration Cards are used to guarantee this specific distribution.
  • The District Collector has control over the District Supply Officer (DSO), who is in charge of all the stores in a district that sell the aforementioned goods and commodities.
  • He or she has the authority to carry out frequent or sporadic raids on these businesses, and if any illegitimate or illegal operations are discovered, he or she may also shut them down.

FAIR PRICE TO AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS:

  • He or she has the authority to provide agricultural loans and assist farmers in holding fair auctions for their produce.
  • He or she also has the authority to establish procurement shops with the aid of the cooperative and marketing departments in order to guarantee the sale of important agricultural products at guaranteed minimum prices in accordance with state policy.

SUPERVISION OF DISTRICT TREASURY:

  • He or she has the authority to provide agricultural loans and assist farmers in holding fair auctions for their produce.
  • He or she also has the authority to establish procurement shops with the aid of the cooperative and marketing departments in order to guarantee the sale of important agricultural products at guaranteed minimum prices in accordance with state policy.

DISTRICT EXCISE DEPARTMENT:

  • The selling of alcohol and other intoxicants is the State Government’s principal source of revenue. The District Collector is in charge of overseeing and giving instructions about the payment of monthly rents, as well as checking the quality of the alcohol and taking precautions to prevent its adulteration, both of which are severely forbidden.

PROTOCOL FUNCTIONS:

  • Abiding by the standing directions, rules and guidelines issued by the Government, the Collector performs protocol functions in accordance with them in a district.
  • A Senior Additional District Collector (SADC) is appointed for the performance of this kind of function. Performance of this function is very vital and any error or mistake in execution of this function can lead to serious consequences to the district collector as he or she is accountable or answerable for his or her actions.

RESIDUAL FUNCTIONS:

  • Any other function in the district that has been left from allocation to any other department of the district is automatically directed to the jurisdiction of the District Collector. He or she is obligated to perform his or her functions and duties within the given budget and regulations imposed by the appropriate Government.

CONCLUSION:

For the purpose of guaranteeing the safety and security of its citizens, the District Collector has the authority to administer a Mini-Government within his jurisdiction or area. He or she is also in charge of upholding law and order within his or her region. Thus, he or she is regarded as being all-powerful in the district that he or she is in control of.

SOURCES:

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