We never talk about Mental Health until and unless a Celebrity Commits Suicide or talks about this issue. The moment we see somebody talking about Mental Health, we copy paste the same messages about Depression and our Social Media Status says that “I am available to talk to you if you ever feel low in life.” Human Emotions are like waves, they keep changing according to the circumstances around us. Teenage and adolscence is a very tricky age.

You can neither treat teenagers as kids nor as adults. They are neither children who need to be guided at every step nor are they fully mature adults, wherein they can take their own decisions. They are at a phase, wherein they are slowly shifting from the sheltered love of their parents to the big brutal world.

It has been observed, that majority of the teenagers undergo depression at some point. We may assume that hormonal imbalances, moodiness, or adolescent defiance are the source of their melancholy. But teenage depression is a life-threatening problem. This talk was given at a local TEDx gathering, produced independently of the TED Conferences.

Social activist Megan Shinnick points out, from her own description, the misconceptions and true sense of depression, as well as the structural flaws blamed for the spike of the disease in teens. Increased pressures on learners might trigger the disorder, as most schools do not have the resources to help students suffering from depression or anxiety. Megan wants each of us to make a difference in the way that society treats and interacts with depression. Depression in our society is not obvious as you stroll down the street or the hallway, but easily open your laptops, your smartphones, your ipads, and maybe one Google search, and you’ll be swept away.

She learned that 16 million Tumblr blogs were studied after her one Google search after a survey undertaken this spring, and of those, 200,000 contained photos , videos, and text messages of teens hurting themselves because of depression. There are different explanations why a teenager can get depressed. Adolescent depression is a severe concern that affects 10.7% of all teenagers. And 29.9 percent of students in middle school; 17 percent of students in high school have attempted suicide. However, depression is frequently unrecognised in teens.

For starters, teens may experience feelings of worthlessness and inadequacy over their grades. School performance, social standing of friends, sexual identity, or family life will all have a significant effect on how an adolescent feels. Depression in teenagers may also arise from depression on the environment.

But whatever the cause, whenever friends or relatives may not tend to improve their feelings of isolation or rejection, there is a good chance that he or she will have adolescent depression, or stuff that teens usually love. Is it that now we have the capacity to express an ever-present impression or is it something greater?

Is it just a coincidence that school systems are becoming more complicated and standardised tests and college admission rates are going down, and traditional men or women are anxious everywhere? Is it possible that our culture is responsible for a growing epidemic that is more than capable of killing us?

And because it’s all considered to be a mechanism, or hormones, or over-emotional, we don’t talk much about it. Sometimes, conversations around psychiatric illnesses such as depression tend to throwing of seemingly meaningless words.

It’s a saying that  “If Life Doesn’t Kill You, Then Emptiness Will  Depression is epitome of emptiness. Depression is underneath neutrality, a state of being.  Depression holds so much power in our society when we stay silent. In a culture that perpetuates it, it’s world-changers like Megan who alter perception, remove the shame, and discover new ways for people to combat depression.

In the meanwhile, 10 percent to 15 percent of the people who have this disorder in our society advocate if you don’t have depression, or whether you don’t know anyone who does.

We are so blessed that we live in a country where our voices are meant to be heard, where our voices are meant to be heard, where they actually mean something. Together, we should combat this disease which rules so many of us. And if you’re out there, you’re dealing with sadness, converting the energy into the force of change that you have to despise this wretched stuff. We can no longer let sadness prevail, because together we can fight back, because we can’t let it prevail. It’s time to fight now.

Tips on How to avoid Teenage Depression

  1. Develop a Hobby and nourish it. There is no age to learn something new. Always follow your hobby along with your studies.
  2. Play a sport. Playing a sport helps you to concentrate and keep your mind fresh and also helps you to build good sportsmanship.
  3. Volunteer. It is important that you learn to do certain activities in life selflessly. Volunteering with an NGO or any local group will help you develop basic emotions such as Empathy and also help you interact with others.
  4. 4. Talk to people. It is important that you communicate with people on a daily basis. Say Hi to your neighbours, smile on seeing a baby, talk to your parents for atleast 5 minutes in a day about your day.
  5. Spend less time playing online games. Virtual Reality cannot replace actual reality. Playing too much of Online Games, will slowly make you feel disconnected with the real world.

For more tips on the same. Do read this Article by Psychologist Munira Soni.

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